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Main Menu -> SALTS -> Pacific Grace 2003 Offshore -> Pacific Grace 2003 Leg 3

Pacific Grace 2003 Leg 3

Log of Pacific Grace

January 21st 2004 @ 20:15
9°27'36.00 N 84°31'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
Hi Everyone.

Yes we have left Puntarenas. Our anchor finally left the bottom at 1430hrs yesterday and we made our way to Curu wildlife reserve once again. Our thought was that leg three trainees might enjoy seeing the monkeys and other wildlife here, and they did. Trainees spent 4 hrs ashore today hiking and exploring the many trails of Curu. Presently we are anchored at Isla Tortuga, one of our favorite anchorages in Costa Rica. All agreed that one more chance to sleep on deck before leaving would be a good idea.

Tomorrow at first light we jump off from the North American mainland and do not return. Even once we arrive home we arrive home to Vancouver Island. Our plan is to be in Cocos Is. for the 24 and 25th. All our new trainees are doing well and interestingly there is only one that I have not previously sailed with. This leg is like a big SALTS reunion.


Observations:
Clear and warm.
January 22nd 2004 @ 19:48
8°24'36.00 N 85°16'12.00 W

Heading 205°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Great day today with spectacular fishing and swim stops in crystal clear blue water. Today was one of the more exciting fishing days we have had so far. At 1200hrs the first fish hit and it took a good half an hour to land it on the Graces decks. Taking 4 people to heave it over the rail this was the third and largest sailfish caught to date. Once landed we figured the weight to be around 150lbs. and the length around 8ī. Shortly after a 35lb Dorado hit and a little later something large enough to take hook and all before we got a look at him. Heather did a masterful job with the fish preparing 3 styles for us to try, cajun, lemon spice and Mike G prepared a delicious teriaki.

Light winds are the order of the day so we have been motoring since 0700. Should be nearing Cocos on the morning of the 24th.


Observations:
Light winds,clear.
January 23rd 2004 @ 19:30
6°20'24.00 N 86°15'36.00 W

Heading 204°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Today was an idealic day in the middle of nowhere. Itīs hard to believe itīs January as itīs 38 degrees and most of us come from the Great White North. Had a swim stop today. The water was gatorade blue and, with the risk of sounding cliche, crystal clear. We swam in watches, the bottom a mere kilometer below, while the rest kept an eye out for unwanted aquatic visitors with sharp teeth. Who knows what swims beneath.

As most exciting events on board are centered around food, I feel compelled to report that we had a variety of amazing, fresh bagels for lunch. Another sailfish was caught this afternoon, but since we gorged ourselves on his brother the day before, it was let go. We should reach Cocos Island sometime tomorrow.

In other exciting news, Skipper has bestowed upon me, Amanda, the prestigous job of making todayīs daily report sound interesting. Hi dad.


Observations:
Warm,some cloud,calm.
January 24th 2004 @ 19:25
5°19'12.00 N 87°1'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
Arrived at Cocos today at daybreak. Anchored in Waffer Bay, cleared with the resident ranger and began our adventures.

Some went ashore to hike across the island and enjoy a coconut and banana lunch once across. They enjoyed great views, thick jungle forests and body surfing. Those who stayed aboard spent the day snorkeling and enjoying a spectacular waterfall that fell directly into the sea. We saw schools of white tipped reef sharks and a variety of multicolored reef fish. Our prize though was without a doubt the waterfall we found a short distance from our anchorage.We had to anchor the inflatable off the beach and swim in through the surf. Once ashore there was a short walk to a 300ī waterfall that was set in a scene striaght out of Lord of the Rings. Eight of us enjoyed swimming in the cool pools and showering under the falls. A small bit of Heaven experienced today by everyone.

We plan to leave tomorrow at approx. 1200hrs.


Observations:
Convection clds all around,warm.
January 26th 2004 @ 17:53
3°13'12.00 N 88°6'36.00 W

Heading 207°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
Left Cocos yesterday at about 1400hrs and shaped a course for the famous Galapagos Islands. We have about 340 miles to travel between Cocos and Galapagos. Progress to date has been slow though due to light contrary wind and an apposing 2 kt current. Our ETA looks like Wed. mid day sometime.

All of us have thoroughly enjoyed Cocos and spent our last day with some hiking and others snorkeling with the sharks on outlying islands.


Observations:
Overcast,doldrum weather.
January 27th 2004 @ 18:30
1°22'12.00 N 89°4'12.00 W

Heading 200°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
We are merely a day from the diverse Galapagos Islands, 65 miles from the equator and only hours from a really delicious looking mud pie. The day was spent sleeping in the sun, sleeping in the shade, eating, napping after lunch, and sleeping on the aftcabin deckhouse. We all excitedly await what Darwinīs Playground has to offer because, frankly, weīre all getting a little lazy. Thereīs also talk of a pending cameo from a certain King Neptune at the equator tomorrow. Last night we had our first service. This was an opportunity to learn about each others interesting and very varied beliefs. Our song and discussion was interupted briefly by the reappearance of a strange helicopter. This same helicopter hovered over us for a time in the afternoon, too. An American army chopper? A tourist company? Columbian air pirates? Who knows. What an exciting life we lead.-AMANDA


Observations:
Light cloud,warm
January 28th 2004 @ 19:33
0°16'48.00 S 90°0'0.00 W

Heading 194°
Speed 5

Ship's Log:
Southern Hemisphere log #1.

It was a day of fear, a day of trepidation, a day of tar and armpits. King Neptune graced us with a premature appearance at sunrise. We observed while he promptly defaced Bosun John and passed on his prestigious position as King of the Sea and of Equator crossing initiation rituals. We approached the Equator at 13:30 whereupon all enthusiastically jumped in and swam ceremoniously across. You may be dissapointed to discover there is no bright red line defining the halves of the Earth. The swim was followed by the INITIATION. This time honored nautical tradition involves, among other disgusting consumption and shaving actions, copious amounts of tar and tallow slathered in the armpits of us landlubbers. But we endured and are now brave and experienced Shellbacks. An aside: we saw land today (Tower Island), will reach Galapagos tonight. -AMANDA


Observations:
clear, cool, calm
January 30th 2004 @ 22:14
0°27'0.00 S 90°10'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
Arrived in Academy Bay yesterday at 0030hrs. and woke up to another exciting location to explore. It took most of the day to clear in so trainees spent the evening ashore. Today all were off to tour the Charles Darwin Research station where you can see the well known Galapagos tortoise both in infant and adult stages of life. Some trainees went snorkeling with sea lions,turtles and white tip sharks. Tomorrow some are visiting the highlands to ride horses and see toroises in the wild while others are traveling to a nearby island with a guide to dive with the famous schools of hammerhead sharks. As you can see there is something for everyone. We have also been invited to a barbeque at an old friends place that we met here 15 years ago, while traveling aboard the Swift.


Observations:
Calm and mostly clear.
February 1st 2004 @ 21:48
0°27'0.00 S 90°10'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
Our last two days have been surreal. From totoises to iguanas and finches, white tipped and hammerhead sharks, pengiuns and sea lions, fishes of all shapes and sizes, sea turtles and more, trainees have been going from 0500hrs to 2400hrs maximizing every minute.

Tonight we enjoyed a truly memorable meal with our old friend Furio Valbonesi. Furio has just completed a new home and he invited us all over to a fine barbecue of steak and fresh fish. Done in true Italian style and taste, our meal was spectacular as was our predinner swim in Furioīs new pool which over looks the islands. Furio is a very generous man and has helped us in many ways during our stay. For a taste of his style and ability go on line and look up Milenium Resorts and check out the Palm hotel in Galapagos on Santa Cruz. Furio designed this complete complex and managed the building process. It is like nothing we have ever seen.

All are very tired and full and at present are staking out thier territory on deck for an idyllic sleep under the stars. Good night.

Ed: here is the link to the Hotel mentioned:
http://www.millenniumhotels.com/flash.nsf/royalpalm.html


Observations:
Warm, mostly clear and calm.
February 2nd 2004 @ 21:34
0°27'0.00 S 90°10'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
Weīre in the Galapagos and we canīt get off the boat.

Our few days ashore were, however, well spent and enjoyable. Diving, snorkeling, touring, shopping and hanging out with giant tortoises were just some of the activities enjoyed by all. But now we are waiting for a water-maker part to arrive and due to ridiculous regulations we are not allowed ashore for more than three days. So here we sit, fully in sight of the ice cream shops, and unable to do anything about it. But all is not unwell. Our resident Mennonites provided us with a Menno-themed afternoon snack of watermelon and rollkuchen. Deep fried, syrupy and delicious. A few lessons were taught, naps were had and many a longing stare was sent towards shore. After a long day in the harbor we are now brainstorming ways to bribe the port captain. More of the same tomorrow.


Observations:
cool calm clear
February 6th 2004 @ 20:59
0°35'24.00 S 90°22'48.00 W

Heading 235°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
We have finally left our friends in Galapagos. Our stay has been extended due to us waiting for a part to arrive from California. Our watermaker needed some TLC before heading off into never never land. All are very excited to be underway and are looking forward to this long passage at sea.

We have been in touch with Pitcairn with our ham radio and all seem to be keen for our visit. Once again our stay in the Galapagos has been a memorable one in many ways. As during our last visits the wildlife was wonderful to see but the people that we met and the way they welcomed and served us will be in our memory forever. All those ashore are hoping for our return.


Observations:
Calm, clear with large harvest moon.
February 7th 2004 @ 18:49
2°19'12.00 S 92°30'0.00 W

Heading 251°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
04:00 we almost hit a whale
08:00 we hauled ourselves out of our bunks and fell over because of the swell
10:04 we shaved the head of Glenn the cook
11:00 we commented on the calm of the water and the heat
14:00 we stopped for a warm bath in the Pacific
18:49 I wrote the log reflecting on the highlights of the hours.

Just a typical day in the neighborhood.

   -AMANDA


Observations:
cloudy, calm, warm
February 8th 2004 @ 20:57
4°7'48.00 S 95°22'12.00 W

Heading 235°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Enjoyed one of our last swim stops today as the trade is begining to build. Just before our stop a whale shark was spotted and we went over for a look. This huge leviathan was at least 35 feet by 6 feet and had us all in awe for some time.

Started motor sailing today with this light wind as it makes for more stable conditions. Fliying fish everywhere, chatted with Pitcairn again last night and all aboard are in good spirits.


Observations:
Convection cloud today, some rain
February 9th 2004 @ 19:37
5°17'24.00 S 97°22'12.00 W

Heading 230°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Spent most of the day at 9kts under reefed main, fore, jumbo and jib. Flying fish all day and another large shark spotted. Presently we are flying trysail, fore and jumbo and the Grace is moving nicely at 6+ knots.


Observations:
Overcast, south wind
February 10th 2004 @ 22:58
6°20'24.00 S 99°35'60.00 W

Heading 233°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
We woke and thought "hmm, what a perfect day for sailing." And so we did. The sun was hot, the sky was blue and the wind was windy. We cruised through the night with the foresīl, jib and trisīl and early this afternoon we raised the main. The full, powerful sail was greeted with hoots and cheers as we increased our speed to an impressive 9 knots. If we keep at this rate, we should be at Pitcairn in a mere ten days!

Mollyīs birthday added to the excitement of the day and I write this while my shipmates continue to enjoy the after effects of generous amounts of cake. We were right, it WAS a perfect day for sailing.
  
   -AMANDA


Observations:
cool, light cloud, calm
February 11th 2004 @ 20:17
8°4'48.00 S 102°9'0.00 W

Heading 235°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Ah,the trade winds at last. We have finally found the longed for consistent winds of the old trading routes. Our Grace has settled into a steady 7-8 knt. gate under reefed main, fore, jumbo and jib. It really is a treat to set your course and go. It does not take much for the Grace to get up and go, very comfortable and dry.

Its hard to believe that we have already distanced ourselves from the Galapagos by over 850 miles. Our days slip by hardly noticed out here. Teaching, chatting, showering, reading and watching the ever changing faces of the sea, easily take our daylight hours. More flying fish and a delightful dolphin show today.


Observations:
Light overcast, warm
February 12th 2004 @ 20:28
9°23'24.00 S 104°17'24.00 W

Heading 235°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
We have been making excellent time with these idyllic winds. Our daily view is of a clear horizon, light cotton balls for clouds and endless schools of flying fish taking flight as we approach. Again a steady 8kts today. If this keeps up we should have a fast passage time for this leg. Grace is doing very well running all of today under full main, fore,jumbo and jib. We are now reefed down for the night and still making good speed. Below you can hardly tell the boat is moving. As well the boat is well balanced allowing the helmsman to steer by two or three spokes only.

All on board are content and enjoying this time at sea.


Observations:
Mainly clear with light puffy trade wind clouds. Very pleasant
temps.
February 16th 2004 @ 12:15
12°1'0.12 S 108°16'1.20 W

Heading 235°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
Editorīs Note:

Position Aproximate.

A Recent messaqge from Tony on the Grace via HF radio..
He says he is in the dead spot for emails and should be out in a few days. They are 1000 miles from Pitcairn with good wind and doing good speed. All is well onboard and are getting excited as they get closer to Pitcairn .


February 17th 2004 @ 03:51
16°1'59.88 S 112°15'0.00 W

Heading 230°
Speed 7.5

Ship's Log:
Editorīs Note:

900 miles to Pitcairn
ETA around the 24th Feb

Thanks to Dave Brown V6PDB on Pitcarin Is. for relaying this position.


Observations:
little wind and motor sailing
February 17th 2004 @ 22:02
17°22'12.00 S 114°34'48.00 W

Heading 220°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Sorry for the lack of communication from my end but I will put full blame on the computer once again. This system is great when it is working, but when it is not I must admit I have considered more than once giving this unit swimming lessons!

Parents we are all fine and very much enjoying our time out here. Please be patient if you do not hear from us for a couple of days. I know that is easy for me to say but this is a fallen world and yes electronics are a part of it. I will always try to get a message out to you some way as I did this time through Pitcairn ham operators.

Since my last note we have enjoyed some wonderful sailing, a thrilling Valentines day party and spreading the ashes of a dear friend. Three days ago we were sailing with main, fore, jumbo, jib,main topsīl and fisherman doing 10kts in a 15knt breeze. It was a great day so we decided to launch the inflatable and get some pictures. To see the Grace from the skiff was breathtaking. We shot still and video with great results.

Valentines day was spent delivering notes to all on board. Each person made their own mail box and by the end of the day each box was filled to bursting with uplifting notes from everyone on board.

Before leaving on this voyage I was given the cremated ashes of a dear friend named Bob Carr. Family wishes were to cast Bobs ashes somewhere in the South Pacific. So yesterday our youngest member, Simon let Bob go with the final words "Bob wawa". Bob had been stored under the aft cabin table since departure day so everyone knew of him. Bob was an old world sailer in the truest sense. Built his own boat by hand and sailed without an engine everywhere.

We are about 4.5 days out from Ducie island, one of the Pitcairn group. We plan to do a drive by there and then continue on to Pitcairn two days further. Presently all onboard are making kites as gifts for the young people on the island. Materials are ripstop nylon and yellow cedar for spars.


Observations:
Calm, mainly clear.
February 18th 2004 @ 22:30
19°10'12.00 S 117°4'12.00 W

Heading 215°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
The calm was incredible today. The sea was mirror-like in itīs stillness and the division between ocean and sky was almost imperceptible. The beautiful calm of the water and the unfortunate lack of wind allowed us our first swim stop in ten days. Many who were not, are now clean. The swim preceeded the second instalment of the group dedicated to awareness of Mennonite cuisine. They served us an afternoon snack of fruit soup, plumimoos. Work continued throughout the day on our gifts for Pitcairn and a number of new clubs are slowly coming to life.

Because of our rapidly approching arrival at Pitcairn, this evening Skipper briefed us on what to expect at the island. He single handedly succeeded in raising the excitement on the boat to an unprecedented level. Those with the hot top bunks will not be the only to have trouble falling asleep tonight.

--AMANDA


Observations:
exceptionally calm, clear and warm
February 19th 2004 @ 21:30
20°30'36.00 S 119°5'24.00 W

Heading 230°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
Great sailing today with wnw wind. Wind backed to sw at supper so we are now motoring into a light head wind. Chatting with Pitcairn regularly each evening and excitment is growing all around.

Birthday games and brownies tonight for Brittany.

Happy birthday to Steve Wynne at home in Mill Bay.


Observations:
Head wind, mainly clear.
February 21st 2004 @ 13:25
23°1'12.00 S 122°33'36.00 W

Heading 240°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
Another day.Wind is all over the place and mostly light. Sailing, motorsailing, motoring then sailing again - all in a day. Everyone is doing well though and all feel that the time has has gone by very quickly. Looks like Ducie tomorrow and Pitcairn two days later.

Ducie is the eastern most island in the Pitcairn group. Quite small and 300 miles east of Pitcairn Ducie does not get many visitors. We hope to drive by and check it out.


Observations:
Clear, light wind.
February 22nd 2004 @ 22:10
24°23'60.00 S 124°30'0.00 W

Heading 3°
Speed 297

Ship's Log:
Paradise Island Entry #1.

Ducie was spotted from the masthead at about 10:45 and cries of "LAND!" rippled enthusiastically throughout the boat. After a relatively safe landing was found, several zodiac trips shuttled us to shore where we wobbled around because the land didnīt move. Ducie, one of the Pitcairn islands, is a small, uninhabited land mass a mile by three quarters of a mile wide, surrounded by water so clear we could easily see the bottom 70 feet below.

Once on shore, we stretched our legs on a hike to the lagoon where we experienced some of the most spectacular snorkeling of our relatively inexperienced lives. Parrot fish, reef sharks, brilliantly colored coral and giant clams were just some of the life found in the warm waters of the reef. This was followed by another hike and once dark, we left our anchorage and are now sailing towards Pitcairn.

--AMANDA


Observations:
light wind, swells, clear
February 23rd 2004 @ 22:30
24°25'48.00 S 126°6'36.00 W

Heading 260°
Speed 2.7

Ship's Log:
Sailing slowly since Ducie as the wind is down and we are trying to conserve some fuel. Also everyone is interested in sailing even if we are not moving too fast. South Pacific mode I think! Our visit to Ducie really was a treat. Ducie is a small atoll complete with interior lagoon and fringing reef on the outside. Ducieīs lagoon is mostly dead in the sense that the coral is no longer living. We did see a variety of fish,some sharks,sea cucumbers and some large clams. We spent the day beach combing, snorkeling both in the lagoon and outer reefs and delighting in the very tame bird life. Itīs a unique experience to visit a place like this where your aloneness is very real. All thought that our visit here was one to remember for a long time. At present we are about 200 miles from Pitcairn which translates to a couple of days at this speed.We are hoping for a bit more wind.


Observations:
Very calm, clear and warm.
February 24th 2004 @ 20:50
24°30'0.00 S 127°24'0.00 W

Heading 279°
Speed 5

Ship's Log:
Weīve all quickly returned to the routine of ship life after our exciting interuption by Ducie. The sun was intense and after we lowered the courses and raised the mainsīl, foresīl and jumbo, shade was difficult to find. We entertained ourselves by hanging from the bowsprit, swinging on the bosunīs chair out over the water, continuing work on our Pitcairn gifts, reading and, of course, sleeping. It was the perfect day for a siesta. Pitcairn is no longer just a distant dream and Iīm sure in the next few days a land sighting party will take their postion on the yard.

A closing heart warming sentiment:

                         Everyone says, "Hi Mom."

--AMANDA


Observations:
warm, light wind, clear
February 25th 2004 @ 20:52
25°0'0.00 S 129°23'24.00 W

Heading 260°
Speed 5

Ship's Log:
Great excitment today as we neared Pitcairn. It started at 1130 with a ham radio contact with the island, and then a little later when we could reach each other by VHF radio. We sighted Pitcairn at 1830 local time which at present is the same time as Victoria (Z-8). All of us watched as the small island grew larger on the horizon amidst one of the most beautiful sunsets we have seen this trip. Our course is almost due west so tonight the sun set over Pitcairn, it was truly spectacular.

Our plan is to approach the island to within a mile or two and heave too untill morning at which time we will anchor in Bounty Bay. Tomorrow our friends will arrive at 0800 to take the first group ashore. All on board are teeming with excitement to say the least. This has been a great passage and we are arriving almost 4 days ahead of schedule. Our Grace is in great shape and all have had a wonderful crossing.


Observations:
Calm,mostly clear and very warm
March 1st 2004 @ 20:32
25°1'48.00 S 130°4'12.00 W

Ship's Log:
We are into our 5th day of another spectacular visit at Pitcairn. It has been a treat to check in with old friends and watch new trainees get so excited about the island and its people. There are few communities in the world like Pitcairn where people will take you into their homes and show hospitality second to none. Trainees are hiking all over the island, swimming in every concivable pool and enjoying large community dinners.

I am back on the boat with one watch after 3 days ashore and already this watch is going through Pitcairn withdrawl, even though they are returning to the island tommorow.

More later.


Observations:
Mostly clear and warm
March 5th 2004 @ 13:45
24°6'0.00 S 132°18'0.00 W

Heading 293°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
From the moment we leaped "on the rise" off the eleven ton long boat and on to the muddy ATVs of the Pitcairners, we felt entirely welcome. For many our arrival meant years of waiting was finally over. We were distributed throughout the families of Adamstown and were treated with more hospitality than we deserved. Our time ashore was spent exploring, hanging out with the locals and, our favorite, eating. Pitcairn island, though it be small, is composed entirely of vivid, beautiful scenery just waiting to backdrop any number of Kodak moments. We swam in St. Paulīs Pool, we perched precariously on the peak at Shipīs Landing Point and traversed great ridges across the top of the island. Donīt worry parents, I wonīt mention the ever-present two hundred foot sheer drop off the side of the often indistinguishable trail. When we werenīt hiking we were eating. Delicious food was generously served to us often more than three times a day. Watermelons, passionfruit, bananas, guava and papayas were offered in abundance. Often we ate untill we couldnīt eat anymore, and then ate some more. The meals were accompanied with great conversation and good humored interaction between us and the locals. We were never treated as tourists but more as friends. During our stay they had two public dinners, a birthday BBQ for Danny and Geoff and a huge mug up in the square. All aboard will agree that the Pictairn people are some of the friendliest, most generous and hospitable people weīve ever had the privilege to meet.

Weīre all sad to leave but none of us will ever forget the amazing time we spent on Pitcairn Island.

--AMANDA


Observations:
ridiculously calm, light cloud, hot
March 6th 2004 @ 20:41
23°4'12.00 S 143°34'48.00 W

Ship's Log:
This is the first night of calm, non-rolly water we have had since the inner anchorage at Puntarenas on leg two.

We are now anchored off the island of Mangareva in the Gambier group.Pacific Grace is so still that at times you feel as though something isnīt quite right. We have motored from Pitcairn as there was no wind to be found anywhere. Amanda did a great job telling you about our stay I have just a few items to add. It was a treat to be able to connect with old friends, particularly the folks over 60 as they are so excited that we have returned. I spent many hours sitting with them and chatting about old times. Pitcairn has not changed much since our last visit. You  can still walk home at night and be greeted with the fragrant Queen of the Night, a small in size, but large in aroma, flower of the island. All of the favorite sights are still to be seen, oh, with the exception of one: Thursday October Christianīs house.

On one of our last days the islanders took us up on our offer to do some work and we all turned too and tore down a piece of Bounty history. Thursday was the son of Fletcher Christian, lead muntineer aboard the Bounty and his house had become dangerous through time and care of the local termites. We saved a corner of the house which shows in detail the nail-less construction used in those days. This will be erected again in the new planned Museum on the island.

As the islanders prepared to leave the side of the Grace they sang their traditional parting songs, which left us all a little weepy. As we sailed away I gave a final goodbye over the radio to the island and almost all house holds responded back with a heart felt thank you and hope you will return. One also responded by asking us to tell the world that Pitcairn remains a safe place to visit and welcomes anyone.

Our plan is to remain in Mangareva for a couple of days before making our way north again.


Observations:
Calm,flat water,clear
March 12th 2004 @ 16:30
20°19'12.00 S 135°32'24.00 W

Heading 353°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
Underway again as of yesterday. We enjoyed a wonderful stay with the peolple of Mangareva.Our decks were continually laden with pamplemosse, papaya, limes, lemons, pomegranate, bananas, coconuts, passi on fruit, to name a few. Often our days would start with an early morning swim followed by some fruit before breakfast. Once again we made many new friends during our time ashore. We had many onboard throughout the day and into the night, playing music and chatting together.

Many Mangareveans are black pearl farmers so trainees had the opportunity to visit the farms out on the lagoon. Also many gifts of pearls were given as a sign of their appreciation of our visit. We were told by the elders of the island that they could not remember when the young people were invited aboard any vessel to sing and be apart of the community. Once again teary faces apeared as we pulled away from the dock.

At present we are on our way to the Marquesas and should be there in 4-5 days.


Observations:
Lumpy sea,mainly clear.
March 14th 2004 @ 09:48
17°2'24.00 S 136°31'48.00 W

Heading 350°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
Beam reaching with a lovely trade and mainly clear skies. We have been sailing since Mangareva and are making good time. Yesterday as we approached the atoll Reao we decided to stop and spend the afternoon checking it out. Reao is one of the easternmost atolls in the Tuamotus and as we found out later has approximately 300 inhabitants, which by the way were overjoyed to see us.

We were very warmly welcomed. Tours to the lagoon and through town were enjoyed by everyone. Fresh coconuts and promises of parties and large dinners were promised if we could stay. We left after dark as the anchorage was very unsafe. Once again we were told that never before have young people visited this area. On our way again, at this present speed we should reach Fatu Hiva in a couple of days.


Observations:
Clear with moderate trade wind
March 15th 2004 @ 15:00
13°34'12.00 S 137°25'12.00 W

Heading 350°
Speed 7

Ship's Log:
On we go, with the wind holding and the Grace making good progress. At our present speed we should be in Fatu Hiva tomorrow afternoon. All are well and enjoying some great sailing.


Observations:
Clear trade wind conditions
March 17th 2004 @ 13:24
10°16'12.00 S 138°24'0.00 W

Ship's Log:
We sailed into Hanavave bay on Fatu Hiva at 0100hrs this morning. Our sail from Mangarava was wonderful we covered the 850 miles in just 5 days. Bonice and I have just retunred from clearing in and have been reaquainted with an old friend from former visits. This woman, Iris, was so thrilled to see Bo again she would regularly touch her shoulder and say "Im so happy,so happy you have come back". Many here remember our previous visits, singing onboard, vollyball and soccer, already they are asking to repeat these past memories. At present the trainees are ashore exploring the island and we do not expect to see them untill supper time.

All are well and have enjoyed this last passage.


Observations:
Clear, warm
March 20th 2004 @ 17:42
9°28'48.00 S 139°0'36.00 W

Ship's Log:
Yesterday we sailed the 45 miles to Hiva Oa and anchored near the main village of Atuona. This is the final resting place of the famous french artist Paul Gauguin. Gauguin spent time painting in Tahiti itself and spent his last days in Hiva Oa where his grave can be visited.

Before leaving going on I must describe our last day in Fatu Hiva. It really was an idyllic one in many ways.It began at 0930 as we all arrived ashore after breakfast. We were on our way inland with a spectacular waterfall as our destination. This waterfall and swiming area has been a favourite on previous visits to the island. We had a different agenda today as 5 of the Graces travelers were to be baptized in the pool below the falls. Lyndsey Pierce,Mike Booth, Sara Brizan, Heather Terriff and Elske Anderson had made the decision that this was the time and place. We had a very moving service complete with guitar and singing with most of the Graceīs crew present. After the baptism service all made their way slowly back to the Grace eating freshly picked mango, banana, oranges, papaya, limes, and coconuts while reflecting on the morningīs events. A day we will not forget for a long time.

We have one more day here and then we will be off to Ua Pou 60 miles to the NW.


Observations:
Rain Squalls, sunshine, rain squalls etc.
March 23rd 2004 @ 20:32
9°12'36.00 S 140°1'12.00 W

Ship's Log:
Ahoyhoy!  

We have been lounging and bodysurfing in Ua-pou for the last 2 days but weīll back up for  a moment and tell you about our excellent adventures in Hiva Oa.  The 21st of March was an incredible day we wonīt soon forget. It started off with the comical sight of Mike G running back to the boat carrying 40 baguettes... Ironically, Mike G does not look unlike a baguette himself. Those of us that attended church were dripping water from our sunday bests as we had managed to sink a dory on the way there, apparently our time at sea hasnīt made seasoned dory handlers of us. It wasnīt how the day started but how it ended that will stand out in our minds for years to come. A group of polynesian dancers did a show for us.  They did traditional dancing involving giant drums, grunting warrior men and swivel-hipped women covered in foliage. They brought us into their dance and taught us the different parts for men and women.  We teased and laughed back and forth and at one point Mike B had a grunt off with the elaborately dressed cheif. As the night came to a close we sang songs together and were given bags of fruit to take home. We left Hiva Oa on a high after experiencing Polynesian tradition and generosity.

Lots of love,
Jordan + Nancy


Observations:
Cloudy,warm
March 29th 2004 @ 09:43
2°20'24.00 S 140°28'12.00 W

Speed 6.5

Ship's Log:
Still motoring in calms as we approach the equator. As you can see we are just over 150 miles away. All are back into the routine of being at sea and clubs are starting up again.

We took on bags of black pearl shells in Mangareva and now everyone is making beautiful jewelry and intricate carvings with the mother of pearl parts of the shells. Dremel tools,sanders and files are busy constantly.

All are well and looking forward to hitting the NE trades within a ady or so.


Observations:
Mostly clear and calm
March 29th 2004 @ 20:43
1°18'36.00 S 140°18'0.00 W

Speed 6.5

Ship's Log:
On we go. Chasing the trades. Equator tommorrow.

Looks like the wind will begin somtime in the next couple of days (fax
pictures)


Observations:
Calm, clear.
March 31st 2004 @ 11:02
3°8'60.00 N 142°11'60.00 W

Heading 322°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
Life on the Grace continues as usual. The very well-organized crib tournament is in full swing, pearl shell crafts are becoming a popular pastime and a talent show is planned for Saturday evening. Exciting newsflash - As I type, we are setting the mainsīl!

Now to yesterday: We passed over the equator, but without the ceremony of our initial crossing. Some swam over the īlineī while others simply glanced up from their books. Not long after, we raised the mainsīl, foresīl, jib and jumbo and cut the engines. Oh the beautiful silence! The day climaxed when Skipper brought out a treat - better than chocolate, more precious than gold, more perfect than a dolphin acrobatic display at sunset...COLD POP! Yup, this is one well run ship.

-AMANDA


Observations:
cloudy, random rain showers, warm with a nice breeze
April 1st 2004 @ 14:40
17°18'0.00 S 149°18'0.00 W

Ship's Log:
Anchored last night in Papeete harbour.It really is a treat to
be back in Tahiti once again.Already we have met people that
remember the visits Swift made years ago.There really is something
special about this area of French Polynesia,remnants of the past
are still visible throughout the town.Trainees are off touring the
island,hiking inland or receiving tatoos.All are well and making
the most out of this short visit to "paradise".We will be heading
out the day after tommorrow.


Observations:
Clear,warm and beautiful
April 2nd 2004 @ 14:10
6°27'0.00 N 143°31'48.00 W

Heading 350°
Speed 6

Ship's Log:
Ha Ha I hope our April Fools gag went over without too much fear back home.

As you can see we are making steady progress towards Hawaii. Trade winds started filling today hopefully they will stay. All are well, preparing for talent night on Sat.

P.S. Happy Birthday Mac, from Emily.


Observations:
Clear,
April 3rd 2004 @ 23:20
9°30'0.00 N 145°18'0.00 W

Heading 7°
Speed 320

Ship's Log:
So it IS true that everyone has a some kind of talent. This eveningīs talent show was an enjoyable mix of silly and serious. Apparently we have psychics, rappers, haiku poets and our own pop band, Scupper 2 Scupper, on board. Other acts included fiddle music, a trainee bench pressing another trainee, lots of slightly off key singing, nose blowing olympics, Blues Brothers reverse karaoke, a penny whistle and harmonica duet, and a number of other odd acts. The show was accompanied by biscotti, popcorn and Starbucksesque drinks in honour of Kateīs birthday.

This afternoon, to counteract the loads of fun we would have in the evening, we performed an intense bunk cleanup. This included the shaking of the sheets, the brushing of the mattresses, a lot of bleach and general disarray. All aboard are now settling down to a weevil free sleep - we hope.

- AMANDA


Observations:
cloudy, some squalls
April 5th 2004 @ 19:45
13°22'12.00 N 148°13'12.00 W

Heading 330°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
Great sailing in big waters today,at points we were double reefed with fore and jumbo flying along on a lively sea.

450 miles to Hawaii.


Observations:
Clear,Cool
April 9th 2004 @ 13:10
18°51'0.00 N 155°10'58.80 W

Heading 340°
Speed 8

Ship's Log:
Editor: Tonyīs Laptop seems a bit sea-sick so this position has been relayed by telephone:

Made Landfall yesterday after some great sailing ~ 8 knts.

Honolulu ETA: late on the 10th



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