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November 13th 2018 - 17:42

The Bosunīs Mate Glossary of Terms

The Bosunīs Mate dictionary of Nautical Terms has been compiled from many sources and is constantly being augmented and revised in our attempt to capture as much of the rich yet complicated (and often conflicting) maritime termonology as possible.

You will find an extensive list of information about all sorts of nautical items from sailorīs knots to the sailors themselves, and from ships to the weather patterns of the seas they ply.

Random terms, by category

Abbreviations and Acronyms (41 terms)
DR
Dead Reckoning
The things sailors do (8 terms)
Over-haul
1. To slack a tackle and thereby increase the distance apart of the blocks in that tackle by manually running the Rope backwards through the sheaves.

2. The action of passing another vessel.

3. Sometimes used to refer to a refit of a vessel - inspecting and repaiting propulsion and mechanical systems on Board.

Why say back when you can say aft instead! (20 terms)
Bearing
The direction of an object expressed as an agnle in degrees or Compass points from the vesselīs meridian, or , sometimes, from the direction of the Bow, Stern, or Beam.

An answer to the question "Where Away"

Common sayings and expressions from maritime lore (149 terms)
Jolly-boat
A small ships Boat from the 18th or 19th centuries, clinker built and propelled by oars. When included as part of a warship the typical configuration was 6 oars on 3 thwarts.

From the german or dutch ījolleī and Swedish īJolī: a small Boat or Bark. It may also be a derivation of Yawl or gellywatte.


The foods of the sea (2 terms)
Sea-pie
A favorite dish for the crew of tall ships. It could consist of almost anything, but the propper dish consisted of layers of meat, vegetables, and fish alternating with crusts of bread and/or broken biscuit - affectionately referred to as a Two or Three decker based on the number of layers.
Various knots both functional and ornamental from the nautical to the ornamental and with both historic and present day value. (12 terms)
Hitch
A Knot used to Secure one Rope to another object or to another Rope, or to form a loop or a noose in a Rope.

Hitches Fall into the general category of knots known as bends



Bits and bobs from life aboard ship (5 terms)
Heart of Oak
A british naval song wirtten by David Garrick that starts:

īCome cheer up, my lads, ītis to glory we steer,
To add something more to this wonderful yearī

Set to music by Willian Boyce in 1759 and commerating that same year "the year of vistories" or "the wonderful year" as the song proclaims. This is based on the victories at Lagos, Quiberon Bay, and the capture of Quebec - which all occured in that year during the seven years war 1756-63.

It was later a traditional...
Specific sailing maneuvers (33 terms)
wing and wing
A method of running before the wind with two sails set. Usually the Mainsail on one side and the Fore or headsail on the other, or one headsail on each side.

- Incidentally the SALTS logo consists of a Schooner running Wing and Wing

The points of sail and seamanship (76 terms)
Channel
1. That part of a body of water deep enough for Navigation through an area otherwise not suitable. It is usually marked by a single or double Line of buoys and sometimes by range markers.
2. The deepest part of a stream, bay, or strait.
3. A cut or groove in a piece of wood or metal
4. A VHF radio feqeuency or set of radio frequencies preselected for communications.

The parts of ships (131 terms)
Iron-Jib
A toung in cheek term for an auxiliary engine on a sailing vessel.
Important people and/or their positions in nautical history (14 terms)
Jack
A name for the common British naval seaman - Jolly Jack Tar in full. the term is derived from tarpaulin (tared canvas) that was frequently worn by topman as protection against the weather. Initially this name was only applied to able seamen but it was relaxed over time to include all naval seamen.
Key locations of the maritime world (20 terms)
Lee-shore
1. A shore that wind blows onto; it is best to Stay well off a Lee shore in a storm.

2. Sometimes used as a metaphor in an expression to signify danger.

Rigging components and terms (104 terms)
Kicking-strap
The Martingale that prevents the Boom from rising when it swings outwards helping to keep the Sail flat to the wind and thereby providing more driving power.

This term is typically used in small racing dinghys whereas a Line or tackle with the same function on modern boats is usually referred to as the boom-vang

Sails, their parts and materials (30 terms)
Genoa
Also known as a Genny or Jumbo, usually the largest Forward staysail on the vessel
Types of vessels and some famous examples (22 terms)
Topsail Schooner
A Schooner with a square rigged Sail on Forward Mast - the Pacific Swift is an example of a Topsail Schooner
The various spars used aboard ship (6 terms)
Yard
A Spar usually fixed horizontally to a Mast that supports a Sail.
The tools of the trade (27 terms)
Anemometer
An instrument for measuring the strength (speed) of the wind
terms awaiting clasification (36 terms)
none found
Meteorology and its relationship to sailing (7 terms)
Force 8
Gale force wind on the Beaufort Wind Scale
 
Total Terms: 539 Total Views: 1640384

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