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January 16th 2018 - 13:21

The Bosunīs Mate Glossary of Terms

The Bosunīs Mate dictionary of Nautical Terms has been compiled from many sources and is constantly being augmented and revised in our attempt to capture as much of the rich yet complicated (and often conflicting) maritime termonology as possible.

You will find an extensive list of information about all sorts of nautical items from sailorīs knots to the sailors themselves, and from ships to the weather patterns of the seas they ply.

Random terms, by category

Abbreviations and Acronyms (41 terms)
COG
Used on most GPS receivers and Chart plotters as the primary Heading reference - since GPS can only plot a position the calculated Heading it estimated based on changes over tile is a Course Over Ground.
The things sailors do (8 terms)
Skylarking
Playing by climbing around in the Rigging. Especially when done as high as possible.  
Why say back when you can say aft instead! (20 terms)
Port
When facing Forward, the Left side of the vessel
Common sayings and expressions from maritime lore (149 terms)
Capperbar
The act of stealing ships stores.
The foods of the sea (2 terms)
Scurvy
A disease historically common to seaman, caused by lack of Vitamin C the British Navy started to fight it bu adding lime juice to their water - this was the origin of the slan "Limey"
Various knots both functional and ornamental from the nautical to the ornamental and with both historic and present day value. (12 terms)
Sheetbend
A Knot used to tie two ropes of unequal thickness together.

Also known as the weaverīs knot

Bits and bobs from life aboard ship (5 terms)
Scrimshaw
A sailorīs carving or etching wood, on bones, teeth, tusks or shells. Frequently used as a way to pass the time on long voyages then to be traded or sold on shore.
Specific sailing maneuvers (33 terms)
wing and wing
A method of running before the wind with two sails set. Usually the Mainsail on one side and the Fore or headsail on the other, or one headsail on each side.

- Incidentally the SALTS logo consists of a Schooner running Wing and Wing

The points of sail and seamanship (76 terms)
Longitude
A division of the surface of the earth measured in degrees east or west of the meridian at Greenwich, England.
The parts of ships (131 terms)
Keel
1. The centerline of a Boat running Fore and Aft;
2. The timber at the very bottom of the Hull to which Frames are attached.

Important people and/or their positions in nautical history (14 terms)
Bosunīs Mate
1) The mate (assistant) to the Bosun

2) One of the worldīs foremost nautical web sites bosunsmate.org (you had to know we would do this)

Key locations of the maritime world (20 terms)
Bridge
The location from which the vseesl is controled.

On mechanically propelled vessels this usually is an elevated platform running Athwartships or may take the shape of a wheelhouse. Typically it is designed to afford a full view of shipboard activities and permit safe Navigation and lookout.

In earlier vessels the Bridge would have been protected by a canvas dodger, and in hot weather an Awning. The Binnacle or main navigational cumpass is typically situated in the Bridge area.

The term d...
Rigging components and terms (104 terms)
Belaying pin
Iron or wood pin fitted into the railing used to Secure Lines.
Sails, their parts and materials (30 terms)
Luff
1. (n) The leading edge of a Sail.

2. (v) The act of a Sail flapping in the wind.

3. (v) To bring the shipīs Head closer to the wind.

Types of vessels and some famous examples (22 terms)
Bark
3 Masted vessel: Square rigged on Fore and main Mast.
The various spars used aboard ship (6 terms)
Mainmast
1. The tallest Mast of the Ship, on a Schooner, the Mast furthest Aft.


The tools of the trade (27 terms)
Messenger
1. A loop of Rope used to assist in weighing the Anchor. Led through two single blocks near the hawseholes and along the Deck running Alongside the Anchor Cable where it is held Fast with Nippers; Then looped around the Capstan and Back up to the Deck and along the Foredeck again. This was done because the hemp Anchor cables were too large to be brought around the capstain themselves.

2. A small Line used to pull a heavier Line or Cable.

terms awaiting clasification (36 terms)
none found
Meteorology and its relationship to sailing (7 terms)
Fronts
Used in meteorology to describe bounderies between hot and cold air masses. This is typically where bad weather is found.
 
Total Terms: 539 Total Views: 1558488

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